Persimmon Power

Oct 22, 2019 | Autumn, Recipes | 0 comments

Fresh kaki persimmons

Kaki ga akaku naru to isha ga aoku naru” (as persimmons turn to orange, doctors turn green) is a Japanese saying similar to the American “an apple a day keeps the doctor away.” This adage attests to the powerhouse of nutrients found in ripe persimmon fruit: all kinds of phytonutrients, flavonoids, and antioxidants, such as catechins (known to have antibiotic and anti-inflammatory properties). Other powerful antioxidants found in persimmons include beta-carotene, lycopene, and lutein. The fruit is also mineral rich: potassium, manganese, copper and phosphorus.

柿釜の白和え

Kaki Kama no Shira Aé

Ripe whole persimmons are scooped out and stuffed with a chunks of the persimmon fruit and briefly blanched chrysanthemum greens tossed in a creamy tōfu sauce called shira aé. The Japanese like to combine (naturally) sweet fruit with bitter greens — tossing the mixture in creamy tōfu binds the pieces together and mellows the disparate flavors.

DOWNLOAD recipe for SHIRA AE in Persimmon Shell

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