ARARÉ Rice Snacks

ARARÉ Rice Snacks

あられ・霰・ARARÉCrisp-and-Crunchy Rice Snacks When listening to the weather report araré means “hailstones” but in the kitchen (or other culinary setting) it means “small cubes” or fine-diced omochi (sticky rice) that has been fried or baked. No doubt the origin of this...
OZONI Honorable Miscellany Stew

OZONI Honorable Miscellany Stew

お雑煮Ozōni “Honorable Miscellany Stew” Served for brunch on Gan Jitsu (New Year’s Day), and on many chilly winter mornings thereafter, ozōni is enjoyed throughout Japan. The name of the dish is rather straightforward and descriptive: the “o” is an honorific...
Yuzu Yu

Yuzu Yu

ゆず湯・Yuzu Yu Food customs in Japan often involve word-play. The winter solstice​ that occurs on or about December 22 is called tōji 『冬至』, literally “winter arrives.” But the word tōji can also be written as 『湯治』meaning “hot-spring cure” or...
Chrysanthemums

Chrysanthemums

食用菊 Shokuyō Kiku Edible chrysanthemums are one Japan’s autumnal culinary delights. Commercially cultivated in various parts of Japan today (including Okinawa!) they were traditionally enjoyed in the Tohoku (Akita, Yamagata) and Hokuriku (Niigata) regions. Though...
Kabocha

Kabocha

かぼちゃ・南瓜KABOCHA Written with calligraphy for “southern gourd,” but pronounced kabocha, the name tells the curious history of this gourd in Japan. Kabocha arrived in Oita (on the southern island of Kyushu) in 1541 on a Portuguese ship. The previous port of call along...
Project Kabocha

Project Kabocha

Classic Soy-Simmered Kabocha & Variations Kabocha, a pumpkin-like squash with sweet, orangey-gold flesh and dark green, edible skin, frequently appears on the menu in Japan. The classic way to prepare kabocha is to simmer it in a slightly sweet soy-tinged stock....