Kitchen Culture

Tasty tidbits from the old-fashioned Japanese kitchen
FUKI no TŌ

FUKI no TŌ

Fuki no Tō   蕗の薹BUTTERBUR  (Petasites japonicas) Sansai, literally “mountain vegetables,” are foraged from woodland areas in various parts of Japan as winter thaws into spring. When sansai dishes appear at table, it signals the start of culinary spring fever: an...

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KASU-JIRU

KASU-JIRU

Salmon Saké Kasu Chowder 粕汁SAKÉ KASU-JIRU A belly-warming salmon and root vegetable chowder, shaké no kasu-jiru, is standard wintertime fare throughout Japan’s northeastern region, the Tohoku. Every household seems to have its own rendition, but with this master...

Japan’s Version of Valentine’s Day

Japan’s Version of Valentine’s Day

A sampling of Japan's chocolates (clockwide from top right) chocolate covered yuzu peel, bonbons filled with various shochū spirits, bonbons filled with saké, matcha infused chocolate planks, white chocolate animal characters, a variety of elegant truffles.The...

SETSUBUN

SETSUBUN

FUKU wa UCHI                    ONI wa SOTO Bring in Good Fortune!       Throw out the ogres!節分 Setsubun, a marker on the ancient, lunar-based koyomi calendar indicates the start of a new season; setsubun breaks occur many times during the year. Today in Japan the...

Furofuki Daikon Piping Hot Radish with Miso Sauce

Furofuki Daikon Piping Hot Radish with Miso Sauce

Furofuki Daikon topped with Yuzu-Scented Miso ふろふき大根 Furofuki Daikon Piping Hot Radish with Miso Sauce Furofuki, literally “blowing steam,” is the name given to vegetables – most often daikon radish – that has been tender-prepped and then simmered in dashi broth....

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