Ohitashi

Nov 12, 2019 | Autumn, Recipes

Spinach ohitashi garnished with katsuo-bushi flakes.

Spinach Steeped in Broth

Hōrensō no Ohitashi

ほうれん草のお浸し

The verb hitasu means “to steep” and is the root of the word ohitashi, a classic dish frequently seen on Japanese restaurant menus, served at family dinner tables, and packed into obentō, too.

Typically leafy greens are briefly blanched, then placed in dashi stock to cool. The stock is tinged with light-colored soy sauce and a drop of mirin. As the vegetables cool they become infused with the flavor of the seasoned dashi.

One way to serve ohitashi is as a compact bundle topped with toasted sesame seeds. For instructions on how to do this, DOWNLOAD the recipe for Spinach Steeped in Broth

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